Biological Sciences

Theresa Calip
509.793.2148
biology@bigbend.edu

Christy Welch
509.793.2156
biology@bigbend.edu

Mariah Whitney
509.793.2149
biology@bigbend.edu

Biology and botany courses may be taken as part of the Associate in Arts and Science DTA degree or as part of the Associate in Science-Transfer degree. Within the Associate in Arts and Science DTA degree, these courses may be used toward the Natural Science Breadth requirement or for Specified or General Elective credit. Students seeking Associate in Arts and Science DTA degree should refer to the catalog section “Degrees & Certificates” for a detailed description of the degree, its program outcomes, and courses that will satisfy degree requirements.

Within the Associate in Science-Transfer degree, biology courses satisfy the AS-T 1 Biology pre-major. The Associate in Science- Transfer degree allows students to prepare for upper division study toward a Bachelor of Science degree in biology (as well as other sciences). This degree gives students the opportunity to make substantial progress toward fulfilling major requirements while completing at least half of the Breadth requirements for Humanities and Social Science.

A degree in biological sciences opens the door to a wide variety of choices—from the health sciences to environmental technology, from biomedical research to wildlife biology. The range of possibilities is limited only by a student’s own interests, aptitudes, and imagination! The biology program provides courses to meet a variety of student needs.

Since programs differ at each college, students should consult program outlines published by the college or university to which they intend to transfer. The following recommended courses prepare students for most baccalaureate institutions. Students should prepare their quarterly schedules with the assistance of an advisor knowledgeable in this transfer area.

These courses are recommended for all areas of life science majors, including but not limited to: pre-dental, pre-medicine, prepharmacy, pre-veterinary, environmental science, forensic science and nutrition.

Degrees and Certificates

Courses

BIOL& 100: Survey of Biology

Credits 5

A study of basic biological principles common to living organisms, this course is intended for non-majors who desire a lab science requirement. Topics of study include: scientific thinking, basic chemistry, cell structure and membrane transport, energy and cell pathways, DNA and gene expression, chromosomes and cell division, genes and inheritance, and evolution and natural selection. Related investigations take place in a required two-hour lab period each week. There will be no required dissections in the laboratory.

BIOL& 160: General Biology with Lab

Credits 5

This course is intended for students pursuing careers in Nursing or other Allied Health fields and satisfies the biology prerequisite for A&P 1 (BIOL& 241). Course content includes the following topics: 1) cellular order and organization including cell chemistry, biological molecules, and cell structure and physiology; 2) energetics including enzymes and carbohydrate metabolism; 3) reproduction, growth and development including DNA replication, cell cycle and control, and cell division; 4) cellular regulation including membranes, transport, protein synthesis, gene regulation, cell signaling, and buffer systems. This course does not satisfy the prerequisite for BIOL& 222 or 223. Related investigations take place in a three-hour lab period each week.

BIOL& 170: Human Biology

Credits 5
This course offers a broad overview of the human body for the non-science major. Topics of study include: unifying biological principles such as basic cell chemistry, cell biology, and metabolism, as well as the biology of selected human systems. Issues related to human biology will also be examined. This course does not include a lab.

BIOL& 221: Majors Ecology/Evolution

Credits 5

The first quarter in a three-quarter general biology series, this series is designed for life-science majors, pre-professional students, and for students intending to take advanced courses in the biological sciences. Topics of study include: ecology including population, community, and ecosystem ecology; evolution including the origin and history of life, microevolution, macro evolution, and systematics; the diversity of life including bacteria, archaea, protists, plants, fungi, and animals. Related investigations take place in a three-hour lab period each week. NOTE: This majors’ biology sequence may be taken in the following order: BIOL& 222, 223, and 221, with instructor’s permission.

BIOL& 222: Majors Cell/Molecular

Credits 5

The second quarter in a three-quarter general biology series, this series is designed for life-science majors, for pre-professional students, and for students intending to take advanced courses in the biological sciences. Topics of study include: cell chemistry and biological molecules, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, membrane transport, energetics and cell metabolism, cell communication, DNA replication, gene expression, and gene regulation, cell division, genetics, and developmental genetics. Related investigations take place in a three-hour lab period each week. NOTE: This majors’ biology sequence may be taken in the following order: BIOL& 222,223, and 221, with instructor’s permission.

BIOL& 223: Majors Organismal Phys

Credits 5

The third quarter in a three-quarter general biology series, this series is designed for life-science majors, pre-professional students, and for students intending to take advanced courses in the biological sciences. Topics of study include: animal and plant anatomy, physiology, and development. Related investigations take place in a three-hour lab period each week.

BIOL& 241: Human Anatomy and Physiology I

Credits 5

An analysis of the structure and function of human skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems as well as the role of receptor-ligand interactions and introductory histology. Emphasis will be given to the homeostatic relationships between systems. Four hours of lab per week will be devoted to exploring these systems. Lab participation is required for credit.

BIOL& 242: Human Anatomy and Physiology II

Credits 5

The second quarter of a two-quarter sequence which includes the structure, function and pathology of the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Emphasis will be given to the homeostatic relationships between systems. Four hours of lab per week will be devoted to exploring these systems. Lab participation is required for credit.

BIOL& 260: Microbiology

Credits 5

An introduction to microbes and their activities. Emphasis will be given to the areas of bacteriology, immunology, virology and epidemiology. Four hours of lab per week is required for credit. Labs will deal with the culture and identification of organisms, as well as genetic transformation.

BIOL 104: Core Concepts in Biology

Credits 2
A review of the biological principles common to living organisms, this course is intended for students planning to take BIOL& 211 who have some prior biology background but would like a review of the basic biology concepts. Topics of study include, macromolecules, cell structure, membrane transport, energy and metabolism, DNA replication, gene expression, cell division, and genetics.