Philosophy

Dennis Knepp
509.793.2190
Philosophy@bigbend.edu

Philosophy courses may be taken as part of the Associate in Arts and Science DTA degree. These courses may be used toward the Humanities Breadth requirement or for Specified or General Elective credit. Students seeking Associate in Arts and Science DTA degree should refer to the catalog section “Degrees & Certificates” for a detailed description of the degree, its program outcomes, and courses that will satisfy degree requirements.

A philosophy major may seek employment as a post-secondary teacher, a minister, or might plan to obtain a graduate degree in a profession such as law, for which a background in philosophy is often recommended. Philosophy, literally the “love of knowledge,” is the parent of all other academic disciplines. One of philosophy’s aims is to provide a way to see all knowledge as a whole in order to arrive at insights none of the other disciplines can achieve. Another of philosophy’s functions is to seek answers to problems in its own specialties such as ethics and logic. Philosophy’s concern is to deal with perplexing questions, which no other discipline can cope with, that people have been asking for thousands of years.

Since programs differ at each college, students should consult program outlines published by the college or university to which they intend to transfer. The following recommended courses prepare students for most baccalaureate institutions. Students should prepare their quarterly schedules with the assistance of an advisor knowledgeable in this transfer area.

Recommended Pre-Major Courses

PHIL& 101 Intro to Philosophy

PHIL& 120 Symbolic Logic

PHIL 210 Ethics

Recommended Philosophy Electives

PHIL 230 East Indian Philosophy

PHIL 240 Philosophy of Religion

Courses

PHIL& 101: Intro to Philosophy

Credits 5
This course is an introduction to philosophy for students who have no previous background in the subject. The course presents a broad overview of philosophical topics of interest and importance such as the nature of knowledge and the contents of reality.

PHIL& 120: Symbolic Logic

Credits 5
This course is a study of the methods and principles used to distinguish correct from incorrect reasoning. Students are expected to prove their understanding of formal deductive symbolic logic by completing logic proofs in categorical, propositional, and predicate logic. (Formerly: PHIL 106).

PHIL 102: Ethics and Policy in Healthcare I

Credits 1

This is the first in a series of five courses exploring values, ethics, and legal decision-making frameworks and policies used to support the well-being of people and groups within the context of the healthcare professions.

PHIL 103: Ethics and Policy in Healthcare II

Credits 1

This is the second in a series of five courses exploring values, ethics, and legal decision-making frameworks and policies used to support the well-being of people and groups within the context of the healthcare professions.

PHIL 201: Ethics and Policy in Healthcare III

Credits 1

This is the third in a series of five course exploring values, ethics, and legal decision-making frameworks and policies used to support the well-being of people and groups within the context of the healthcare professions.

PHIL 202: Ethics and Policy in Healthcare IV

Credits 1

This is the fourth in a series of five courses exploring values, ethics, and legal decision-making frameworks and policies used to support the well-being of people and groups within the context of the healthcare professions.

PHIL 203: Ethics and Policy in Healthcare V

Credits 1

This is the fifth in a series of five courses exploring values, ethics, and legal decision-making frameworks and policies used to support the well-being of people and groups within the context of the healthcare professions.

PHIL 210: Ethics

Credits 5
An introduction to ethical theories and some of today's main moral problems such as abortion, euthanasia, war, and capital punishment. Topics vary.

PHIL 230: East Indian Philosophy

Credits 5
This course will provide an introduction to the classical philosophical schools of India. It will discuss the problems and methods of these schools and their relationships with some of the major schools of Western Philosophy.

PHIL 240: Philosophy of Religion

Credits 5
Philosophy of religion is an attempt to think critically and rationally about religious issues. This course will use classic and contemporary texts to explore several interesting issues such as the problem of evil: if God is all knowing, all powerful, and all good, then why do the innocent suffer? Many philosophers have tried to answer that question and more.

PHIL 250: Asian Philosophy

Credits 5
This course introduces to students the major intellectual currents in East Asia, with the focus on Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism. Student will follow the unfolding of the intellectual history chronologically, and discuss the teachings of most influential thinkers in East Asia.

PHIL 340: Professional Ethics

Credits 5
This course explores ethical principles and the ethical problems that managers face in a business environment. Students will examine the role of ethics and social responsibility in the management of business. Students will be able to apply the codes of practice, standards of conduct, professional responsibilities and regulatory aspects associated with common professional business. A study of trends with respect to ethical, legal, economic, and regulatory conditions in the global marketplace is included.