Sociology

David Holliway
509.793.2179
sociology@bigbend.edu

Suzanne Richards
509.793.2193
sociology@bigbend.edu

Sociology and social welfare courses may be taken as part of the Associate in Arts and Science DTA degree. These courses may be used toward the Social Sciences Breadth requirement or for Specified or General Elective credit. Students seeking Associate in Arts and Science DTA degree should refer to the catalog section “Degrees & Certificates” for a detailed description of the degree, its program outcomes, and courses that will satisfy degree requirements.

Sociology is the scientific study of human groups and their social systems. Sociology includes the study of the North American system of marriage and family and the major social problems facing our society and the world. Sociology is a valuable major not only for students planning careers in social research, criminal justice, demography, social work, and education, but also for those pursuing a course of study in public administration, law, market research, gerontology, and drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs. Although a two-year degree in this field can aid employment in the human service field, students should be prepared to go for their bachelor’s degree in sociology or social work at a four-year institution.

Since programs differ at each college, students should consult program outlines published by the college or university to which they intend to transfer. The following recommended courses prepare students for most baccalaureate institutions. Students should prepare their quarterly schedules with the assistance of an advisor knowledgeable in this transfer area.

Recommended Pre-Major Courses

SOC& 101 Intro to Sociology 

SOC& 201 Social Problems

Social Welfare

Social welfare is a course of study about our society’s response to human need. This program is designed to enhance student awareness and understanding of the fields of social welfare and social work and their response to this human need. Social welfare is a valuable major for those seeking careers in such fields as services to families, health care, mental health, corrections, gerontology, law, drug and alcohol rehabilitation, vocational rehabilitation, the clergy, and industry. Although a two-year degree with emphasis in this area may aid employment in the social welfare system, students should be prepared to continue their education through a bachelor’s degree in social work at a four-year institution.

Since programs differ at each college, students should consult program outlines published by the college or university to which they intend to transfer. The following recommended courses prepare students for most baccalaureate institutions. Students should prepare their quarterly schedules with the assistance of an advisor knowledgeable in this transfer area.

Recommended Pre-Major Courses

SOCW 110 Intro to Social Work

Courses

SOC& 101: Intro to Sociology

Credits 5
Sociology is the scientific study of human groups and their social systems. Sociologists study how groups are organized and structured, their character and interaction, how groups change, and their impact on individuals. The course focuses on applying the “sociological imagination” which in turn helps students understand and appreciate different societies and cultures both contemporary and historical. (Formerly: SOC 110).

SOC& 201: Social Problems

Credits 5
A sociological analysis of the major social problems facing both the United States and the world today. Among the topics analyzed are: Family and disorganization, social deviance, poverty, crime, over population, and environmental degradation. (Formerly: SOC 270).

SOC 204: Gender and Power

Credits 5
This course is an introduction to the discipline of Women’s Studies, surveying numerous academic areas and exploring concepts basic to the field. Students will critically examine the social understandings of gender, and the powerful role it plays in American culture. Areas of consideration will include the role of gender in education, labor, economics, and privacy issues.

SOC 220: Marriage and the Family

Credits 5

A comprehensive examination of the institution of marriage and family life, including past, current, and future trends. The course will help students understand different marriage and family patterns and will develop skills for meaningful, long-term, intimate relationships, and is structured to promote the critical thinking and problem-solving skills of students by using the sociological perspective. Topics include the social construction of the family, race/ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation, and social change. (Formerly: SOC 270).

SOC 320: Organizational Behavior

Credits 5
Exploring current theory and research of organizational behavior, this course covers managing relationships within an organization. Students will study the concepts of corporate culture, organizational structure, environmental influences, decision making, group behavior, and organizational politics.